In the early 20th century, a coterie of poets gathered in Nashville, Tennessee, determined to redefine the way the world viewed the south. They would prove that the South could produce highly intellectual art. The Fugitive, a literary magazine published from 1922-1925, proved that point. Of the 16-member group of poets known as "The Fugitives," four members went on to become professional men of letters. John Crowe Ransom, Donald Davidson, Allen Tate and Robert Penn Warren made tremendous contributions to the art of poetry through their individual voices, their influence on the art form, and the legacy they left behind. Ultimately these poets would redefine Southern poetry.


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This NPT original production was made possible by a grant from the Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission. Archival materials, poetry recordings and research assistance generously provided by Vanderbilt University Special Collections. Additional photographs courtesy of the Library of Congress and the Tennessee State Museum.